Close menu

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit

Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

Whether you’re planning something as small as a new app rollout or as significant as a complete restructuring, having an effective change management process in place is a must. But don’t worry, we have everything you need to know to be an effective change agent for any new solution.

What is change management?

Change management is fundamentally about successfully guiding people through a behavior change. It’s easy to get bogged down in business jargon when we talk about organizational change (“We have this new tool and we need to successfully deploy it by EOW to meet our Q4 OKRs!”), but the human factor is at the core of all change. If old habits die hard, any change management strategy has to fully account for those who will be impacted by the update, or it will fail.

Why is a change management process important?

We’ve all seen the outcomes of poorly managed change: low adoption, fear, anxiety, and falling back on old habits. After a series of failed changes, people eventually stop trusting that any change will be successful, then stop even trying to effect change — at which point a business ceases to be competitive, and stagnates. Having an effective change management process in place is a risk mitigator and enables organizations to sidestep this stagnation cycle altogether.

The first step in a good change management process is knowing the why behind the change, and then following it up with clear communication and an incentive to change. After all, not getting buy-in is one of the main ways change management processes fail, but it’s not the only one. Get a deep dive into why change management efforts fail.

Top reasons changes go wrong

  • The reason behind the change is poorly understood or communicated
  • Leadership doesn’t buy in
  • The right stakeholders aren’t part of the process
  • Implementation isn’t well thought out
  • There’s a lack of short or long-term follow-through
  • The process is led without empathy

What are the five steps of change management?

In order to set your organization down the path of successful change (and mitigate potential risks), there are five major steps to take.

1. Prepare for change
When we think about prep, we tend to think about logistics and solutions (which are important), but an underrated aspect of the preparation process is looking at how a change can be supported by behavior and culture. Help employees and leadership understand where the problems are before introducing a new solution; actively solicit feedback on the current state of things and use it to inform how you communicate your upcoming change and identify who needs to be a stakeholder.

2. Make a change management plan and communicate the strategy and vision
Now that you understand how to position your change for broader organizational buy-in, you’re ready to determine the scope, craft a rollout plan.

  • The reason behind the change is poorly understood or communicated
  • Leadership doesn’t buy in
  • The right stakeholders aren’t part of the process
  • Implementation isn’t well thought out
  • There’s a lack of short or long-term follow-through
  • The process is led without empathy

How to ensure you have the right change management tools

Review your change management toolkit
Now that you understand how to position your change for broader organizational buy-in, you’re ready to determine the scope, craft a rollout plan.

Change management needTop change management tools
Ensure all guidelines are kept up-to-date and accurateGuru
Create and share process diagrams across the teamLucidchart
Miro
Whimsical
Create and share process diagrams across the teamLucidchart
Miro
Whimsical

Centralized knowledge for every team

Collect, connect, and democratize knowledge and insights

[if lte IE 8]
[if lte IE 8]
[if lte IE 8]
[if lte IE 8]
[if lte IE 8]
[if lte IE 8]
[if lte IE 8]
[if lte IE 8]
[if lte IE 8]
[if lte IE 8]
[if lte IE 8]
[if lte IE 8]
[if lte IE 8]
[if lte IE 8]
[if lte IE 8]
[if lte IE 8]